The World’s Most Dangerous Bridges Will Take Your Breath Away

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We’ve put together a list of the world’s most dangerous bridges. Whether they were constructed using jungle materials or professionally built by the world’s top engineers, the bridges on our list will definitely have you taking a new route to work…

Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge – Ireland

The Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge in Northern Ireland might just be the scariest hanging bridge on our list. Every year, thrill-seekers from all over the world head to the UK to walk across the 65-foot bridge that stands 100 feet above the rocky shores and cliffside. The Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge was originally designed by a fisherman who wanted to get to Carrick Island. For some reason, this fisherman decided to include just one rope handrail. Thankfully, the bridge now has handrails on both sides.

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Royal Gorge Bridge – Colorado

The Royal Gorge Bridge in Colorado is one of the most spectacular suspension bridges in the world. The bridge, which spans 1,260 feet over a rocky canyon, was first built in 1929. For over 50 years, the Royal Gorge had no stabilizing wind cables, a feature which is now considered crucial for a bridge’s structural integrity. In 1982, the bridge was finally renovated, and wind cables were added. While the Royal Gorge Bridge is now much safer, we still wouldn’t recommend looking down!

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Millau Viaduct – France

The Millau Viaduct is the tallest bridge in the world. The cable-stayed bridge crosses the Gorge Valley of Southern France and stands about 1,125 feet above the base. The bridge is over 8,000 feet long and 105 feet wide. Construction began in 2001 and finished in only three years. To this day, the Millau Viaduct is praised as one of the greatest modern-day engineering achievements, and even won the 2006 Outstanding Structure Award from the International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering.

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Iya Kazurabashi Bridge – Japan

High above the Iya-gawa River in Tokushima, Japan, you’ll find the magnificent vine bridges of the Iya Valley which date all the way back to the 12th century. Among these unique footbridges is the Iya Kazurabashi Bridge, a terrifying and rickety structure made of wooden planks connected with mountain vines weaved together for extra strength. Cross the bridge if you’re looking for a rush, and if you’re feeling courageous, cross the bridge without holding onto one of the handrails. Just be sure to watch your step!

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Mystery Bridge – Indonesia

The ‘Indo Board’ is a device used by surfers and skateboarders to help them develop and work on balance. Basically, the goal is to balance a wheel-less board on a foam cylinder without either end touching the floor. Even the most well-trained ‘indo-boarders’ wouldn’t fare so well on this bridge in Indonesia, which appears to be on its very last leg and probably shouldn’t be in use by anyone. For some reason, that doesn’t seem to bother these schoolchildren!

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Bridge Of Immortals – China

Just getting to this next bridge is a wild adventure in its own right. The Bridge of the Immortals is located in the mountains of Eastern China. The Huangshan, or “Yellow Mountain,” range is home to one of the most iconic historical sites and tourist destinations in the whole region. The trail leading to the Bridge of the Immortals is made of narrow wooden planks and some rusty nails. It follows the cliffside and wraps around the mountain.

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Sidu River Bridge – China

Above the Sidu River valley in the Badong County of China, you’ll find the Sidu River Bridge, a suspension bridge that stretches for over 4,000 feet. It’s a long way down from this bridge- 1,600 feet to be exact. Constructed in 2009, the Sidu River Bridge was the world’s highest bridge at the time. Unlike many of the other bridges on our list, the Sidu River Bridge was built professionally, using modern technologies. Regardless, it’s still awfully scary to cross!

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Trift Bridge – Switzerland

Spanning 558 feet over the glaciers of Switzerland at a height of 328 feet above sea level, the Trift suspension bridge is situated near the town of Gadmen in the Swiss Alps. The bridge was initially constructed in 2004, but those who were daring enough to cross the bridge on foot quickly noticed a pretty big problem with it. In windy conditions, the bridge would sway back and forth violently. So, in 2009, stabilizing cables were integrated to minimize the dangerous swinging.

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Deception Pass Bridge – Washington

Deception Pass Bridge actually consists of two separate two-lane bridges that connect Whidbey Island to Fidalgo Island in the state of Washington. At about 180 feet above the water of Oak Harbor, Deception Pass Bridge spans close to 1,500 feet. Surprisingly, it cost more to repaint the bridge’s spans in 1983 than it did to build them in 1935. This bridge is not only an impressive demonstration of human engineering capabilities, but also a historical monument included in the National Register of Historic Places.

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Hanging Bridge Of Ghasa – Nepal

Believe it or not, the Hanging Bridge of Ghasa in Nepal is used for both humans as well as animals. On a regular basis, donkeys and cattle traverse the terrifying footbridge hanging high above the river valley. Despite its vulnerability to wind and rain, the Bridge of Ghasa has been used actively for decades. While the bridge often sways back and forth, it is equipped with high side rails, providing security to those daring enough to cross.

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The Langkawi Sky Bridge – Malaysia

This terrifying rollercoaster of a bridge wasn’t completed until 2005. With its unique design, the Langkawi Sky Bridge actually curves through the mountains of Kedah in Malaysia. The most frightening aspect of this bridge, which spans 410 feet, is that it only utilizes just one angled pylon for support. In 2012, the bridge was shut down for maintenance and upgrading. After years of delaying the bridge’s reopening, it was finally opened and deemed suitable for regular use again in 2015.

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Mount Titlis Bridge – Switzerland

About 10,000 feet above sea level in the Swiss Alps, you’ll find a pedestrian bridge suitable for only the bravest of thrill-seekers. The Titlis Cliff Walk is thought to be the highest elevation suspension bridge in all of Europe. The bridge has a length of 320 feet with a width of just 3 feet, giving visitors the sensation that they’re walking along a tightrope. Although this bridge can reportedly withstand winds of up to 120 miles per hour, we won’t be pushing our luck anytime soon.

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Vitim River Bridge – Siberia

Located in the tundra of Siberia, it’s honestly a miracle that the Vitim River Bridge is still standing today. The bridge, which is just 6 feet wide, is made of rusting metal with rotting wooden planks used as a walkway. Aside from the apparent deterioration, the most dangerous aspect of this bridge is the frequent build-up of ice. If you still want to cross this slippery pathway, keep in mind that there are no railings and the bridge teeters back and forth with the river’s tide.

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Quepos Bridge – Costa Rica

Any bridge with the nickname of “The Bridge of Death” or the “Oh My God” bridge is certainly deserving of a spot on our list. The Quepos Bridge on the central Pacific coast of Costa Rica is situated along the road connecting Jaco to Quepos. It was constructed back in the 1930s as a railroad. Even though this bridge is barely suitable for one-way car traffic, truck drivers frequently attempt to cross the narrow pathway because they simply have no other options.

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Eshima Ohashi Bridge – Japan

If you’ve been to a theme park like Six Flags, you’re probably familiar with that feeling of anxiety and suspense as a rollercoaster slowly approaches the drop-off point, immediately followed by the stomach-churning sensation of falling over the edge. That’s exactly what you’ll experience when you drive over the Eshima Ohashi Bridge in Western Japan. This two-lane bridge covers about a mile over Lake Najaumi and rises rapidly at a 6.1 percent gradient, allowing ships to pass beneath the road.

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Sunshine Skyway Bridge – Florida

This massive Florida bridge connects St. Petersburg to Terra Ceia. The Sunshine Skyway Bridge, commonly referred to as “the Skyway,” stretches for over four miles above the waters of the Tampa Bay. The spectacular feat of engineering took about five years to build. Today, the Sunshine Skyway is considered Florida’s “flag bridge.” If you’ve got a fear of heights, we would strongly suggest taking a boat to cross the Tampa Bay because the Skyway stands at a whopping height of 430 feet.

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U Bein Bridge – Burma

The U Bein Bridge in Burma crosses the Taungthaman Lake. It spans about three-quarters of a mile and was constructed in 1850 using a type of tropical hardwood called teak. As you can see, this bridge is extremely dangerous because there is no form of support and nothing to hold onto along the sides. In addition, the U Bein Bridge has become a hotspot for criminal activities in recent years. A small police force now guards the bridge to protect tourists.

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Storseisundet Bridge – Norway

The Storseisundet Bridge, located in Norway, connects the mainland of the Romsdal peninsula to the island of Averøya. This unique bridge was built using cantilevers, massive structures that extend out horizontally but are only supported at one end. The Storseisundet Bridge covers a distance of 850 feet. At its highest point, the bridge is 75 feet above the sea. It took a total of six years to build the bridge thanks to the region’s unpredictable weather and frequent hurricanes.

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Root Bridges – India

The coolest thing about these bridges in India is that they are constructed entirely by nature. The Ficus elastica, a tree that thrives in the southern Khasi and Jaintia hills, produces a network of secondary roots that project outwards from higher up on the trunk. Over time, local tribes like the War-Khasis and the War-Jaintias learned how to manipulate the growth of the trees’ roots and create these spectacular bridges and pathways over rivers and through the forest.

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Seven Mile Bridge – Florida

As you could probably guess, this bridge stretches for close to seven miles, connecting Knight’s Key in Marathon, Florida, to the Lower Keys. The Seven Mile Bridge, which was one of the longest bridges in the world at the time of its construction, probably doesn’t seem so dangerous upon first glance. However, once you consider the inevitable hurricanes that hit Florida on a yearly basis, you’ll understand why this bridge is among the most dangerous bridges in the United States.

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Montenegro Rainforest Bridge – Costa Rica

If you loved to climb trees as a child, you might want to consider visiting the Sky Walk in Costa Rica on your next getaway. This vast network of footbridges allows you to trek through the treetops of the Monteverde rainforest. In total, the six suspension bridges stretch for 984 feet and give visitors the opportunity to see what lies within the upper levels of the jungle. Just be sure to use plenty of bug spray and watch out for snakes!

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Taman Negara Canopy Walkway – Malaysia

The Taman Negara canopy walkway in Malaysia is believed to be the world’s longest suspension footbridge of its kind. Stretching for over 1,700 feet and standing over 130 feet above the forest floor, this bridge has become a spectacle and must-see destination for tourists from all over the world. You’ll need some serious nerves of steel if you want to make it all the way to the other side of this footbridge! Whatever you do, don’t look down!

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Keshwa Chaca Bridge – Peru

While most people probably wouldn’t trust a bridge made of woven grass, the Keshwa Chaca Bridge has stood strong since it was created over 500 years ago by the Incas. Building this bridge was truly a team effort. First, Incan women braided small, thin ropes, which the men then used to braid large support cables. Even though the Keshwa Chaca Bridge has withstood the test of time, it is actually the last remaining structure from the age of Incan engineering.

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Monkey Bridges – Vietnam

If you ever visit Vietnam, you’ll find plenty of these handmade bamboo passways, known as “monkey bridges.” They are particularly prevalent in the areas of the Mekong Delta and the Red River Delta. While several locals have no problem crossing monkey bridges, which often lack any sort of handrails, visitors and tourists are typically terrified at the thought of stepping foot on these primitive structures. Vietnamese locals will frequently cross monkey bridges while carrying between 20 and 50 kilograms of supplies on their shoulders.

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Longjiang Suspension Bridge – China

The Longjiang Suspension Bridge, also known as Long River Bridge, is located just outside of Baoshan, Yunnan, China. Spanning over 3,900 feet, and standing 920 feet above the Long River, the Longjiang Bridge is one of the longest bridges ever built, as well as one of the tallest. A relatively new creation, the Longjiang Bridge finished construction in 2016. Before this massive bridge was built, driving from Baoshan to Tengchong meant taking an incredibly inconvenient 8.4-mile detour.

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Capilano Suspension Bridge – Canada

High above the Capilano River in Northern Vancouver stands the Capilano Suspension Bridge, a pedestrian walking bridge which sees more than 800,000 visitors each year. The simple suspension bridge is 460 feet long and about 230 feet above the water. The bridge was first constructed in 1889 by a Scottish civil engineer named George Grant Mackay. After it was sold twice, Henri Auveneau eventually ended up buying the bridge and decided to renovate the entire structure in the mid-1950s.

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The Pontchartrain Causeway – Louisiana

If you ever find yourself driving on the Pontchartrain Causeway in Southern Lousiana, rest assured that you will eventually be back on land. Just make sure you have plenty of gas in the tank because this bridge is almost 24 miles long. While it might not look so intimidating in photographs, realize that when drivers are in the middle of this bridge they can’t see land in either direction. If you’ve got a fear of big bodies of water, stay away from the Pontchartrain Causeway!

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Aiguille Du Midi Bridge – France

You could say that the Aiguille du Midi Bridge in France is situated between a rock and a hard place. At 12,605 feet above sea level, this short bridge has been known to raise heart rates of daring visitors who decide to look down. In order to get to the Aiguille du Midi Bridge, travelers must take a 20-minute cable car that ascends a total of 9,200 vertical feet before reaching the scenic and precariously placed human-made structure.

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Kakum Canopy Walkway – Ghana

Kakum National Park in Central Ghana is home to an extensive network of hanging bridges. The bridges of the Kakum Canopy Walkway can reach 160 feet above the forest floor. Even with the safety netting, these bridges are terrifying to cross!

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Ai Petri Bridge – Ukraine

High up in the mountains of Ukraine, thrill-seekers and mountaineers will find this frightening footbridge that crosses over a canyon 4,200 feet deep. The Ai Petri bridge connects two peaks of the Crimean Mountains. What makes this bridge particularly dangerous is the massive amounts of wind and fog that the area deals with on a regular basis. Even on a relatively calm day, visitors can feel the bridge swaying back and forth as they cross over the enormous canyon.

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Hussaini Hanging Bridge – Pakistan

The village of Hussaini in Northern Pakistan is home to Borit Lake and the Hussaini Hanging Bridge. Watch your step, because this footbridge features unpredictable gaps between the sticks and wooden planks which serve as a makeshift walking path. The Hussaini Hanging Bridge has been destroyed and rebuilt several times throughout its history, probably because it was never constructed professionally in the first place. You’ll need nerves of steel if you want to make it to the other side!

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Mekong River Crossing – China

The Mekong river flows through a total of six different Southeast Asian countries – China, Burma, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam. Depending on where you are along the river’s path, the water conditions can range anywhere from gentle to full-on raging rapids. This photo must have been captured just after a severe storm. The man walking along the wires appears to be an expert slack-liner, and it’s a good thing because falling into the water could be very dangerous!

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Baliem River Bridge – Western New Guinea

This bridge is located in the Baliem Valley of Western New Guinea. We definitely would not recommend crossing this makeshift structure unless you’re interested in going for a swim in the rough waters and foaming rapids of the Baliem River. While it’s clear to us that whoever built this bridge followed the same basic outline that the professional engineering companies use, we’re not so sure it’s safe to trust in their strange and primitive use of building materials.

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